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By STEP LIVELY FOOT & ANKLE CENTERS
November 23, 2021
Category: Foot Issues
Tags: Sweaty Feet   Hyperhidrosis  
Sweaty FeetSweating occasionally is normal. It could be a particularly hot day or you could simply be hitting your workout hard. In these instances, sweating isn’t just normal, it’s expected; however, if you find yourself sweating excessively, particularly in your feet, and for no reason whatsoever you may be wondering what’s going on.

Your Sweaty Feet Could be Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is the medical term for excessive sweating. Plantar hyperhidrosis is when people experience excessive sweating of the feet. Men are often more likely than women to develop this issue. The good news is that if your podiatrist determines that you have plantar hyperhidrosis there are ways to several ways to treat it.

Your Hyperhidrosis May Be Secondary

Okay, so what does this mean exactly? This means that you may have an underlying condition that could have brought about hyperhidrosis. So by finding and treating the underlying cause we can often alleviate hyperhidrosis. Secondary hyperhidrosis may be caused by:
  • Menopause
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Anxiety
  • Diabetes
  • Intense stress
  • Certain prescription medications such as antidepressants
  • Tuberculosis and other infections
  • Dysautonomia
We’ll Try Conservative Measures First

As is the way for treating most health conditions, your podiatrist will often recommend certain lifestyle changes and simple treatment options first to see if these are effective enough against excessive sweatiness. Only if these treatment options don’t work will your podiatrist turn to more aggressive options. Conservative options include:
  • Applying deodorant or antiperspirant to your feet
  • Applying antifungal powder to the feet
  • Making sure not to wear the same shoes two days in a row
  • Choosing breathable shoes (shoes made from leather or canvas)
  • Wearing moisture-wicking socks
How a Podiatrist Can Help

While a podiatrist can recommend a variety of options to help you manage your sweaty feet, there are instances where you may need to turn to a foot and ankle specialist for more aggressive treatment. One way that a podiatrist treats sweaty feet is with iontophoresis, a painless device that passes mild electrical currents through the feet to temporarily stop sweat glands from producing sweat. Along with iontophoresis, a podiatrist may also recommend Botox injections, which can also temporarily stop excessive sweating for anywhere from 6-9 months.

If you are dealing with sweaty feet and it’s impacting your daily routine or making you uncomfortable, a podiatrist can evaluate your issue and figure out how to get your sweating under control.
By STEP LIVELY FOOT & ANKLE CENTERS
November 01, 2021
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: Splinters  
SplintersGetting splinters in the feet is fairly common. Of course, some people wonder if they can simply leave a splinter in their foot and let it work itself out. Others may not know how to safely remove a splinter, which can cause more harm than good. A podiatrist can help you remove splinters from your feet, particularly in children who may be squeamish about having parents remove them.

Why Splinters Need to be Removed

Regardless of whether the splinter is wood, glass, or even a plant thorn, you must remove it from the foot as soon as possible. Why? Because these foreign objects also contain germs, which can lead to an infection if the splinter isn’t promptly and fully removed.

How to Remove a Splinter Yourself

You probably have all the tools you need at home to remove a splinter safely. Of course, it’s important to go over the basics of safe splinter removal. Here are tips for safely removing the splinter:
  • Soak the foot in warm water for a few minutes to soften the skin
  • Wash your hands thoroughly before removing the splinter
  • Once the skin has softened in the water, see if you can squeeze the splinter out by simply applying pressure to both sides (like you would a pimple)
  • If squeezing doesn’t work, you can use tweezers or a sewing needle to remove the foreign object (just make sure to disinfect these tools first with rubbing alcohol)
  • If the splinter cannot be grabbed with tweezers, use the needle to create a small opening around the splinter to make it easier to grab
  • Be gentle and careful when removing the splinter to avoid breaking it
When To See a Podiatrist

While a splinter often isn’t a big deal there will be situations in which turning to a podiatric physician will be the best option. You should turn to one if:
  • You aren’t able to remove the splinter or foreign object yourself
  • The area becomes red, tender, swollen, or contains pus (signs of infection)
  • You feel like there’s a splinter but you can’t see it
  • You have diabetes or nerve damage in your feet (do not try to remove a splinter yourself)
  • The splinter is too deep or too painful
  • Your child is too squeamish or won’t sit still so you can remove the splinter
If there is a foreign body in your foot or your child’s foot, or if there are symptoms of an infection present, it’s important that you turn to your podiatrist right away to have the splinter removed and the area properly treated.
By STEP LIVELY FOOT & ANKLE CENTERS
October 21, 2021
Category: Foot Conditions
Tags: Bone Spurs  
Bone SpursBone spurs may develop on your foot over time and cause severe pain. Recovering from this health issue requires a careful approach and a myriad of different treatments. Understanding each of these options will help to make your recovery smoother and minimize your suffering as an individual. Here's what you need to know about this topic, including both non-surgical and surgical care options for your spurs.

Non-Surgical Care for Bone Spurs 

Most podiatrists attempt non-surgical care before turning to any operating on a bone spur. These simple steps help to minimize pain and relieve suffering. Typically, they'll start by suggesting over-the-counter pain medication or prescribing high-dose medicines of this type. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, and naproxen sodium can all help to cut back on this kind of bone spur pain. 

However, they may also suggest icing the area, prescribe regular massage visits, or even provide specialized shoes or footwear that support the bone spur and minimize your pain. The extra padding helps to keep the spur from rubbing up against the shoe and worsening. Sometimes, they may also prescribe a weight-loss routine, including a specialized diet and controlled exercise routines to help decrease foot pressure. 

Most of the time, these treatments help to minimize pain and keeps you on your feet. Typically, they rarely cause any serious complications and can be worked around in your day-to-day life. But, unfortunately, there are instances in which a bone spur could be more than a minor nuisance. In these situations, surgery is necessary to ensure that you recover fully from this problem.

Surgical Options 

Does your bone spur press on your nerves and limit your range of motion? If so, you're not alone. Many people experience this kind of struggle and need surgery to recovery. Surgeons start by checking the extent of your bone spur and seeing how it impacts your foot and leg and your mobility.

Then, they'll carefully come up with a surgical plan that removes the spur and keeps your body safe. This procedure requires carefully opening up the skin around the spur and surgically cutting it away from the foot. A short recovery period will follow, one that helps to ensure your foot fully recovers before you put excess weight on it.

Find Help Today 

If you think you have a bone spur and want to get help, reach out to a local podiatrist today to learn more. They'll work with you to find a treatment plan that makes sense. Catching it early enough should minimize your need for surgery. With this type of help, you can regain a pain-free life and transition back to the everyday experiences that your bone spur has robbed from you. 
By STEP LIVELY FOOT & ANKLE CENTERS
October 06, 2021
Category: Foot Injury
Tags: Broken Toe  
Broken ToeA broken toe is one of the most common minor injuries that you can suffer. However, sometimes, it can prove difficult to tell whether or not you actually have a broken toe. As a result, it is best to know some signs that you do in fact have a broken toe. This is helpful information no matter whether you are planning to visit a podiatrist or if you are thinking about handling your broken toe all on your own. Stubbing your toe is pretty common and most of the time, the pain goes away relatively quickly and you continue with your day. If the pain does persist, you may have a broken toe, so keep these signs of a broken toe in mind. 

Are You Able to Put Weight on Your Foot?

One method that you can use to determine whether or not you have actually broken a toe is checking if you can put weight on your foot. If you can walk on your foot without limping or pain, your toe is likely not broken. Icing the toe and using some non-prescription anti-inflammatory medication will probably be enough. In the event that you continue to experience swelling or severe pain, you should see a doctor about your toe. 

Does Your Toe Have a Deep Wound?

You should take a close look at your injured toe. If your toe has a deep wound or cut, the bone in your toe might get exposed to the air and a doctor should check out your injured toe. Another sign that you have a broken toe is bruising. Additionally, one more sign that you have actually broken your toe is some discoloration on or near your toe. An obvious sign of a broken toe is if it is at a different angle than the toe on your other foot.

What Else Should I Know About Broken Toes?

Taping is a common solution for a broken toe. This works just fine if the break in the toe is simple and the bones are still in alignment. Taping your broken toe will not help it heal properly, though. That is why you should keep the following information in mind: 
  • Consult a doctor about your broken toe so it heals correctly.
  • Taping your toe could worsen the situation if you have a bad break in your toe. 
  • Taping your toe is only a viable solution in some circumstances.
By STEP LIVELY FOOT & ANKLE CENTERS
September 24, 2021
Category: Foot Care
High Blood Pressure and Your FeetWhether you are concerned about high blood pressure or you already have been diagnosed with this chronic condition you may be surprised to hear that it can also impact your feet. After all, your blood pressure affects your circulatory system, which in turn impacts the body as a whole. Since uncontrolled or improperly controlled hypertension can damage blood vessels of the feet, you must have a podiatrist you can turn to to make sure your condition is under control.

What problems does high blood pressure pose?

People with hypertension often deal with plaque buildup in the blood vessels. This is known as atherosclerosis. Plaque buildup also causes a decrease in circulation in the legs and feet. This can also increase your risk for peripheral artery disease (PAD). Over time, this decreased circulation can also lead to ulcers and, in more severe cases, amputation. This is why it’s incredibly important that you have a podiatrist that you turn to regularly for checkups and care if you have been diagnosed with hypertension.

What are the signs of poor circulation in the feet?
 

Wondering if you may already be dealing with poor circulation? Here are some of the telltale signs:

  • Your feet and legs cramp up, especially during physical activity
  • Color changes to the feet
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Temperature changes in your feet
  • Hair loss on the legs or feet
  • Sores
If you are dealing with any of these symptoms you must schedule an appointment with your podiatrist. Simple physical exams and non-invasive tests can be conducted to determine how much loss of circulation is occurring in the feet. Your podiatrist will work with your primary doctor to make sure that your current medication is properly controlling your blood pressure.

By getting your blood pressure under control we can also reduce your risk for developing PAD, heart disease, and other complications associated with hypertension. Some medications can be prescribed by your podiatrist to improve peripheral artery disease. Surgery may also be necessary to remove the blockage or widen the blood vessel to improve blood flow to the legs and feet.

If you are worried about your hypertension and how it may be impacting the health of your feet, there is never a better time to turn to a podiatrist for answers, support, and care.




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